Posts Tagged ‘buttons’

Felt Patches with Buttons

April 25, 2018

I unearthed more felt in my studio. I have no idea when – or why – I bought it. Still, it’s in my possession so I figure I should turn it into a project. My other felt patches worked pretty well, so I decided to go smaller and use up some of my button collection with this latest experiment.

This is a great project to sew while watching TV. If you have a bunch of precut squares and leftover floss, you can keep your fingers occupied through many a binge-watching session. I had a supply of 2” strips, so I cut the first felt square 2 ½ inches, the second 3 inches.

These little patches can be attached to tote bags, pillows, quilts, dog collars, baseball hats, whatever you have around that cries out for embellishment. If you decide to make some, send me a picture of where they end up. We could start our little journey of the traveling patches.

Luck and wisdom!

The Season of Silly Things

December 2, 2015

This is the time of year that pack rats shine. We find things, silly things, to go on tables or in stockings or on trees. I’ve already had a good start to the season, thanks to the Thanksgiving turkey that graced our table.

Lani Longshore gingerbread turkey

I found this gingerbread turkey kit at Trader Joe’s. The gingerbread pieces were already made. My son and I had great fun assembling the kit, although I suspect he had more fun laughing at how excited I was to put the critter together.

My reward for sorting another bin in the sewing room was finding some buttons I bought years ago. I plan to glue this moose on a plain, flat ornament and add it to my Christmas moose collection.

Lani Longshore moose button

The pink flamingo buttons may sit in the “what do I do with this” pile a little longer, but I’m still thrilled to discover them.

Lani Longshore pink flamingoes

Quilting Arts magazine’s latest reader challenge is to illustrate your super power in fabric. This month my super power is finding silly things and having fun. I plan to bead the living daylights out of this fabric.

Lani Longshore beading project

I’m not sure what I’ll call the piece, but I do know I’ll be giggling the entire time I’m making it just because of the tin I’m using to hold the lavender beads.

Lani Longshore mint tin

Luck and wisdom!

Style = Story + Strata

August 14, 2013

I’ve said before that I wait for the fabric to speak to me before I start a project. I’ve also admitted that very often my color choices depend on what I can reach. This week I accepted the truth – my style is determined by the story behind the materials and where those materials are in the layers of stuff around my studio. Rather than fight the reality of my cluttered creative space, I will embrace it and turn that bug into a feature.

 

Another reality I have embraced is that I have no space for another quilt anywhere – not the walls, not the chairs or couches, not the beds – but I can always use another tote bag. I made two.

 

Lani Longshore flamingo tote

 

I had an eighth of a yard of bright pink fabric with either flying birds or flying bats (I think they’re birds), some hot pink purse handles, hot pink chenille on a spool, and a yard of flamingo fabric.

 

Lani Longshore flamingo fabric

 

The is tote is big enough to carry my sharing to quilt guild meetings, which is why I attached my name tag to it.

 

Lani Longshore celtic box tote

 

I finished the small, square tote from the fabric that Margaret Misegades gave me. The celtic fabric really is from Ireland.

 

Lani Longshore dove

 

The dove is not from Ireland, but I thought it went well with the celtic pieces.

 

Lani Longshore button

 

I bought the button embellishments in Santa Fe at the SAQA conference. They are made by Robin Pascal of Perfect Buttons. When I bought them, I had no idea how appropriate that name is, as I think they really are perfect for this project.

 

And so it is with my new-found label for my style. It doesn’t really describe what comes out of my studio, but it certainly describes my process. For the moment, that is as good as I’m going to get.

 

 

 

Sneaking Up On A Tipping Point

June 27, 2012

You might remember my button blog. I have lots of buttons, including many space ship buttons. Last week I showed you one quilt with space ship buttons. Here is another in the series. Oddly enough, this one also started with a gift from Ann Anastasio that she might not have intended.

Ann and I belonged to the same friendship groups. This cityscape went through both of them, and Ann still couldn’t find a suitable way to finish it. The piece started as a Challenge project to create an urban landscape. Ann made the buildings. It fit the assignment, but not much else. So she used the it as a beginning for a Progressive Party project. I remember working on it (I put in the gray sidewalk and brown cityscape fabric).

Then it sat for a long time. I unearthed it from a bin of fabric she gave me when she moved, and decided to make it another space invasion quilt. I found suitable border fabrics –

then bound it and started sewing on buttons.

Since it is an invasion quilt, I used lots of space ship buttons.

I found an alien head pendant that may or may not glow in the dark in my collection of treasures.

The reason I am so excited about this quilt is that I only used what was closest to hand. I even pieced the batt for it, because I had several scraps of essentially the same weight batting in a stack that I could reach. When I tidy up the leftover bits, I will have shaved something off the top of three separate piles. Since my frontal assaults haven’t been as successful as you might think, I decided I would try a different approach. If I keep making projects with what’s at hand, I might just be able to sneak up on a tipping point where I can consolidate three stacks into one bin (or tote bag). This might not be the sort of war strategy they teach at West Point, but it has chance of working for me.

 

 

 

Gifts to Self

June 20, 2012

Happy Solstice! My summer gift to myself was letting the vacuuming go while I embellished a couple of quilts. I unearthed a bag of treasures intended for the Fish ‘N Cat quilt. First was a sprig of seaweed:

Next was a pair of fish earrings Alison Anastasio gave me:

Alison is the daughter of Ann Anastasio, who worked on this quilt (and is co-author with me of Death By Chenille). These were one of her favorite pairs of earrings when she was younger. She found them recently and didn’t want to toss them but knew she would never wear them again. I promised her I would find a good home for them on this quilt.

I continued working on the quilt from last week, including adding another braid for the top binding:

Then I scattered buttons on the surface to see what it would look like:

In case you were wondering, yes, those are my toes on the bottom braid/binding.

Here’s a close-up of my space ship buttons:

I also auditioned embellishments for the area intended to be a legend. The quilt is an invasion map, so naturally there would be a section explaining the symbols. I haven’t quite figured out how the dragon will explain any symbols – I just like the looks of it.

I spend a lot of time on the floor when I’m embellishing quilts as the buttons and beads tend to fall between the sofa cushions, so tomorrow my gift to myself may very well be doing the vacuuming.

Button Invasion USA

June 13, 2012

Once again the Challenge assignment is helping me clear out stuff. We were tasked with interpreting a piece of literature in fabric. I decided to do some shameless self-promotion (as well as some back story work) and use one of my own stories. I’m writing a novel set in the far future on a planet that has been invaded by Earth. I decided I would make a tapestry suitable for the thirty-whatever century. This is the beginning:

Planet-wide landing zone

The background is from my collection of space-ish fabrics. The planet is a convergence exercise my friend Ann Anastasio gave me when she was clearing out her studio (I’m not sure she meant to do that, but I found a use for it and she hadn’t so there). I tipped the convergence piece on its side to look like a landing zone grid.

From there I added a Celtic twist ribbon, since my humans represent the Third Viking Hegemony, and a Celtic twist was the closest I could get to something a Viking might use.

The quilting represents shock waves around ships.

These will be the ships.

Ed Wood would be proud

I have a huge collection of buttons that remind me of space ships. I intend to use lots of them on this quilt. I also have a huge collection of trims:

I used one on the sides in place of binding.

Underneath that Celtic twist ribbon will be some sort of legend for interpreting the tapestry. I also decided to quilt in some insignia. I have a logo (a Scottish thistle), so it seemed reasonable to assume the invading forces would have something, too. Since I did the quilting with black thread, it is easier for you to see the pattern from my sketch.

I haven’t sewn all the buttons on yet, so you’ll see this again, perhaps with another top using the leftover space ship buttons.

And yes, it feels great to use stuff!

This is how it starts

June 6, 2012

You buy a new sweater. It comes with extra buttons. You put them in a safe place. Time passes, you give the sweater away. You still have the buttons.

Your favorite shirt is to too old to wear, but too soft to give away. You use it to polish the silver, but first you cut off the buttons.

Before you know it, you have a button collection.

Sometimes you find a use for the buttons.

Sometimes you find a place to hide them.

Before you know it, the button collection has you. My button collection has me around the throat, but I’m fighting back. I have an idea for a series of quilts that will use a fair few of my buttons. With any luck, I’ll have something to show next week.